DB FPX8410 Assessment 2 Analyze a Set of Worker Complaints

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Name/Demographic DataLocation:Remote or OnsiteJob Title/SalaryEEO ClassificationComplaintNature, Viability, & Severity of Legal RiskLegislation/Nature of Legal LiabilityEthical Issue(s)Rationale
Maryanne Kahlil,Married,38 yearsOnsiteF- t. DepotAnalyst- Research and Development65,000Black-Muslim WomanFacing apparent hatred, she has been criticized for her attire and encountered challenges in obtaining health insurance.(DB FPX8410 Assessment 2 Analyze a Set of Worker Complaints
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She has faced ridicule due to her adherence to Islam, endured a hostile work environment, sought the administration’s assistance in renewing her insurance coverage, and experienced religious discrimination.COVID-19 Workers’ Compensation Policies. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act (Federal Trade Commission, n.d.).Social disparities, hate, biasThe employee seeks equitable treatment, and extending a renewal of health insurance could be a means to achieve this.
Thomas Lee,Married,34 yearsOnsite – BirminghamSecurity guard19,760Asian Chinese ManSubjected to discrimination, raising concerns about lost earnings, facing allegations of contributing to the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, enduring workplace harassment, and receiving online hatred.His coworkers have displayed unequal treatment towards him, and he is requesting support from management due to racial discrimination.Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Communications Decency Act, Georgia liability/Immunity LawDefamation of character  (Smith, 2020).Bias, absence of fairness, enduring harassmentIf an employee experiences racial discrimination and encounters hate due to their race, they may seek legal representation; it is imperative to put an end to racial discrimination.
Karen Small,Unmarried,33 yearsOnsite-BirminghamSecurity guard19,760White WomanShe was compelled to work despite her illness during the COVID-19 pandemic, lodging complaints about colleagues not adhering to preventive measures and not receiving compensation for time off.She suspects contracting COVID-19 due to her Chinese colleague and is requesting compensation for the workdays she missed due to potential virus exposure during the pandemic.National Labor Relations Act, Worker’s Compensation Claim, Georgia COVID-19 Workers’ Compensation Policy, The Fair Labor Standards Act (Steele, 2021)..Absence of ethical work practices exposure due to non-compliance with preventive measures.Employee burnout can lead to decreased job satisfaction. Implementing precautionary measures is likely to mitigate this risk.
Heather Brown,Unmarried,25 yearsOnsite – BirminghamFacilities Laborer- Janitor19,760White WomanTaking on the workload of two individuals equally, concerned that management is not addressing the needs of new employees, and observing a decrease in her role’s effectiveness due to the excessive workload.She is complaining that management appears hesitant to bring in new staff and is requesting a review of the situation and potential changes to the conditions, given the overwhelming workload.Illinois COVID-19 Workers Compensation Policy, National Labor Relations Act, The Fair Labor Standards Act (Steele, 2021).Unjust conduct, inadequate assistance, diminished effectiveness.The organization does not adhere to the principle of justice. Responsibilities should be evenly distributed among employees.
Leah Parrish,Married,33 yearsOnsite – VauxhallManufacturing Associate23,929Black WomanThe workplace management needs to pay more attention to the importance of COVID-19 precautionary measures, and there has been no prior communication regarding the salary reduction.She is distressed by the unsafe working conditions in her company that jeopardize her health and is requesting both full salary and workers’ compensation claims.COVID-19 Workers’ Compensation PoliciesThe Occupational Safety and Health Act and Fair Labor Standards Act  (Smith, 2020).Inadequate workplace conditions, unannounced salary reduction, and unprofessional conduct by the management.Employees do not feel secure in their workplace, and organizations should take into account their requests for compensation.
Chris McCoy,Unmarried,38 yearsChris McCoy,Unmarried,38 yearsOnsite – VauxhallCall Center Operator21,840Black ManThe organization’s arrangement is unsafe in the context of COVID-19; employees work closely together in a confined office space.He is concerned that the workplace is not adhering to safety precautions, posing workplace safety concerns and increasing the risk of exposure to the pandemic virus (Jennings & Perez, 2020).The Occupational Safety and Health ActAlabama COVID-19 Workerâs Compensation PolicyNational Labor Relations Act.Environment is unsafe
John Kowalski,Married,40 yearsOnsite – Vestavia HillsCall Center Manager35,000Black ManHad close contact with a colleague who was infected and subsequently contracted the virus. The company is reluctant to cover medical expenses, and they have been pressuring sick employees to return to work.He alleges that the company did not implement precautionary measures. Furthermore, the company is not providing coverage for medical expenses compensation claims, and there are concerns about pandemic virus exposure.Alabama COVID-19 Workers Compensation Policy, Fair Labor Standards Act, Family and Medical Leave Act (Jennings & Perez, 2020).Failure to adhere to precautionary measures and employees being compelled to work.The organization is not extending coverage for medical expenses but is evaluating the employee’s request to have these bills covered.
Thomas EdwardsMarried, 60 yearsOnsite – AtlantaQuality Assurance Manager79,250White ManThe company is downsizing, and they let him go before he could retire. The company is using the pandemic as a justification for not assisting him in finding new employment.He was compelled into retirement, and there have been issues with the mismanagement of his pension funds. He is struggling to secure a new job due to the pandemic, and he has filed workers’ compensation and age discrimination claims.Employee Retirement Income Security Act, COVID-19 Workers’ Compensation Policies, Age Discrimination in Employment Act (Andrias, 2019).Lack of employee rights and age-based discrimination.The employee has been unable to secure new employment due to the pandemic, and the previous organization is not reevaluating its decision to terminate his services. The company should consider rehiring the employee and address his workers’ compensation claims.
Mona Sims,Married,40 yearsOnsite – AtlantaAdministration-Bookkeeper30,900Black WomanSubjected to unequal treatment, endured significant salary reductions, and encountered an unsatisfactory response from the Finance Director.Only female employees experienced salary reductions, faced threats from the Finance Director, and filed gender discrimination claims.The Equal Pay Act of 1963, the Fair Labor Standards Act, the COVID-19 Workers’ Compensation Policies, Family and Medical Leave Act (PengJu & Hua, 2023).Discrimination and a lack of communication with the management.Female employees are experiencing significant salary reductions due to gender discrimination. Organizing training sessions for the management can enhance their understanding of gender equality issues. (DB FPX8410 Assessment 2 Analyze a Set of Worker Complaints
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John Braganza,Married, 32 yearsOnsite – AthensManufacturing Associate21,424Black ManDiscrimination against lower-tier employees, a lack of willingness from the supervisor to assist them, and uncooperative management.He is complaining about the unequal treatment of low-wage employees, alleging discrimination in the workplace, and filing a claim for benefits discrimination.Alabama COVID-19 Workers Compensation Policy, Fair Labor Standards Act, The Civil Rights Act of 1991 (PengJu & Hua, 2023).Discrimination in the workplace and uncooperative management.Employees with lower wages are experiencing pay reductions. The company should ensure that all employees receive their full salary regardless of their position.
Geoffrey Jones,Married,43 yearsAthensOnsiteSenior Distribution Manager50,000Black ManHe was terminated from the company based on his race, and the HR department showed reluctance to cooperate.The company downsized its workforce because of the COVID-19 pandemic and dismissed employees without prior notification. This has led to claims of discrimination based on protected classes and color.California COVID-19 Workers’ Compensation Policy, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (PengJu & Hua, 2023).Discrimination based on color and class, with no cooperation from higher authorities.The primary concern here is class discrimination. Enhancing collaboration within the HR department would likely lead to increased employee satisfaction.
Adam Humphrey,Unmarried,16 yearsOnsite – AthensParts Runner5,000White ManWorking excessively long hours with a need for more cooperation from the manager.He was initially hired with the understanding that he would work on weekends, but his workdays were extended due to a shortage of employees. This situation raises concerns about age discrimination.Illinois Liability/Immunity LawFair Labor Standards Act and Civil Rights Act (Federal Trade Commission, 2023).Excessive workload and age-related discrimination.Employee dissatisfaction stems from excessive workload, and the company must address the problem of staff shortages.
Joanne Martin,Married, 34 yearsOnsite – AthensShipping & Receiving22,066White WomanInappropriate alterations to the work schedule, a manager displaying rude behavior, and the fear of being terminated.She is concerned about the evolving nature of her job and the demanding schedule, and she is requesting schedule accommodations for single mothers.Single Parent Protection Act, Illinois COVID-19 Workers Compensation Policy, National Labor Relations Act (PengJu & Hua, 2023).Rude behavior from the staff, a lack of cooperation from the administration, and allegations of gender discrimination.The discourteous behavior of authorities and uncommunicated changes in schedules have led to staff dissatisfaction. The organization should consider granting rights to staff members facing challenges like single parenting.
Monica Fuentes,Unmarried,23 yearOnsite – AthensManufacturing Associate20,800Hispanic Female/LBGTQExperiencing problems with a colleague, including being subjected to bullying and harassment.The situation is escalating, and she is genuinely concerned about her safety and security. She is considering filing a workplace bullying and harassment claim.The Republic Act 10627, Texas COVID-19 Workers’ compensation policy, The Equality Act  (Mcintosh & Moss, 2020).Enduring harassment and bullying without receiving any form of justice.This female employer from the LGBTQ community is encountering harassment from staff members. Raising awareness among the staff about individuals’ personal choices could help address the issue.
OmariMasriOnsite – PeoriaLogistics InternNigerian Woman (DB FPX8410 Assessment 2 Analyze a Set of Worker Complaints
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Compelled to cover the shifts of others without compensation and enduring the rude behavior of the supervisor.Her nationality was targeted when she inquired about her wages, and she experienced discrimination from the supervisor.Violation of Protected Class – National Origin, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964,Illinois Liability/Immunity Law, Fair Labor Standards Act, and Civil Rights Act  (Mcintosh & Moss, 2020).Experiencing discourteous treatment, lacking support from the supervisor, and being compelled to work in place of others without receiving any compensation.She is encountering discrimination due to her different cultural background. Resolving the issue may involve addressing her concerns and ensuring fair treatment by paying her dues.

References

Federal Trade Commission. (2023). Protections against discrimination and other prohibited practices. Federal Trade Commission. https://www.ftc.gov/policy-notices/no-fear-act/protections-against-discrimination

Ilyin, E. A., & Demidov, N. (2020). Employee abuse: Typical case studies. Юридическая наука и практика, 15(4), 29–34. https://doi.org/10.25205/2542-0410-2019-15-4-29-34

Jennings, W. G., & Perez, N. M. (2020). The immediate impact of COVID-19 on law enforcement in the United States. American Journal of Criminal Justice, 45

Mcintosh, K., & Moss, E. (2020). Examining the Black-white wealth gap. https://memphis.uli.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/49/2020/07/Examining-the-Black-white-wealth-gap.pdf

PengJu, Z., & Hua, Z. (2023). A study on employment discrimination for older people – The construction and improvement of China’s “Anti-employment discrimination law.” Korean Citation Index, 71, 393–434. 

Smith, S. R. (2020). Supreme Court 2019–2020: Insanity, discrimination, and DACA and a pandemic. Journal of Health Service Psychology, 46(4), 181–199. 

Steele, D. (2021). Preserving pandemic protections. SSRN Electronic Journal, 42

Executive Summary

This report delves into the issues raised by employees and assesses the potential impact on the workplace environment. A comprehensive risk assessment was carried out to gain a deeper understanding of the risk landscape. It is the responsibility of the designated expert to thoroughly investigate all workplace allegations, including those related to discrimination, harassment, provocation, and insubordination, ensuring compliance with the law. Furthermore, there are claims of policy violations. Each complaint is documented in the accompanying chart (Pascarella et al., 2021).

DB FPX8410 Assessment 2 Analyze a Set of Worker Complaints

CapraTek has been assigned the task of examining all employee complaints concerning the perceived unjust conduct of the management, encompassing issues like bullying, harassment, and discrimination. This report evaluates these employee grievances and their potential implications for the work environment. To maintain adherence to legal obligations, the designated specialist must investigate all workplace complaints related to discrimination, provocation, harassment, and insubordination. Additionally, there are allegations of policy infractions. The areas of concern and associated potential risks are detailed below, along with initial recommendations for addressing them (N. Demidov, E. A. Ilyin, 2020).

Complaints with Higher Risk

The situation involving Thomas Lee, an Asian Chinese employee, poses elevated risks for the organization. He is experiencing ongoing harassment and a perceived lack of fairness in his treatment. He may consider legal action against the company, leveraging existing legislation, such as the International Labor Organization regulations from 2023. On the other hand, Adam Humphrey, a 16-year-old employee, was initially hired under the condition that he would only work on weekends. However, his schedule has been modified, resulting in an excessive workload. His complaint has the potential to pose significant risks for the company, especially because he is a minor, and he may be able to invoke the protections provided by the Fair Labor Standards Act and the Civil Rights Act (Levavi, 2019).

What We Recommend

Focusing on addressing complaints that pose a higher risk and potential exposure to the company is a strategic advantage. These complaints, when compared to others, demand a more direct allocation of resources for resolution. To proactively mitigate future issues, we strongly recommend implementing the following actions. In compiling this list, CapraTek has prioritized several recurring complaints within the company. CapraTek must take steps to address each of these areas comprehensively. This approach ensures that employees across all levels of the organization understand the issues, helping to prevent future problems for both the team and the company while also taking care of all team members (Cox & Lowrie, 2021).

Related Assessment: DB FPX8410 Assessment 3 Critical Incident Analysis

To enhance the workplace environment and address the issues highlighted, CapraTek will implement the following measures:

Training Initiatives

  • Comprehensive training will be provided to all managers and administrators to ensure strict adherence to CapraTek’s hiring and staffing policies and Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) regulations.
  • Staff will be educated on the safe operation of heavy machinery, emphasizing that only certified personnel are permitted to operate such equipment.
  • Communication consistency will be improved through training for all employees (Wang et al., 2020).

Discrimination Awareness

  • Discrimination training will be conducted to mitigate staff frustration stemming from gender, race, ethnicity, culture, pregnancy, and nationality discrimination (Adel & Alqatan, 2019).

Compensation Review

  • A compensation review will be conducted to ensure equitable salary distribution throughout the company.

DB FPX8410 Assessment 2

  • In the event of necessary pay reductions, they will be implemented fairly, without discrimination or favoritism (Rudakov & Prakhov, 2020).

COVID-19 Control Policy

  • CapraTek will establish a robust COVID-19 control policy, ensuring that all locations have an adequate supply of personal protective equipment to mitigate virus transmission.
  • A policy for office staff will also be formulated to promote social distancing and other preventive measures (Carnevale & Hatak, 2020).

Open-Door Policy

  • An organization-wide open-door policy will be instituted, enabling all employees to report concerns directly to higher authorities.

Analyze a Set of Worker Complaints

  • Employees are encouraged to communicate if they believe their immediate supervisor needs to be more responsive or if they have concerns about potential retaliation or harm caused by their supervisor. This will foster an environment where errors and misunderstandings can be minimized (Sun et al., 2022).

Anti-Harassment Training

  • Human Resources, along with directors, supervisors, administrators, and employees, will receive training on anti-harassment policies.
  • These policies will ensure that workers’ complaints and grievances are treated confidentially, assuring employees that their concerns will be handled appropriately (Brue, 2021).

DB FPX8410 Assessment 2 Analyze a Set of Worker Complaints: Numerous ethical concerns are intertwined with these grievances, encompassing the absence of fairness and discrimination rooted in factors like color, race, religion, or nationality. Furthermore, employee complaints illustrate instances of inequality, animosity, harassment, diminished effectiveness, and unprofessional conduct among colleagues. Addressing these complaints necessitates the implementation of tailored solutions that align with the specific needs and demands of the employees (Carnevale & Hatak, 2020).

Legal Liability Risks for Various Complaints 

Maryanne Kahlil may have a valid case under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act if she can demonstrate that she faced discrimination based on her gender or national origin. Furthermore, several states have enacted COVID-19 Workers’ Compensation Policies to safeguard employees who contract the virus, potentially providing coverage to Maryanne under her state’s policy. The risk to Capra Tec would hinge on the potential damages awarded in a potential lawsuit, incorporating lost wages, benefits, emotional distress, and suffering, as well as potentially punitive damages (Federal Trade Commission, n.d.).

Thomas Lee’s complaint might find merit under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, It bars discrimination based in race, ethnicity, religious beliefs, gender, and country of origin. Thomas Lee’s accusation of being blamed for spreading the COVID-19 pandemic could potentially be construed as national origin discrimination. If proven, Capra Tec might face financial liability in the form of lost wages and compensation, similar to a case where a pharmaceutical company was fined $253 million for discrimination (Smith, 2020).

DB FPX8410 Assessment 2 Analyze a Set of Worker Complaints

Karen Small’s case potentially holds ground under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). According to the FLSA, employees must receive compensation for all hours worked, including overtime. Additionally, DB FPX8410 Assessment 2 Analyze a Set of Worker Complaints the FFCRA mandates that employers offer compensated sick leave to workers who cannot perform their duties because of COVID-19, such as quarantine or self-isolation. The potential risk to Capra Tec involves financial damages, including back pay, and potential penalties for violating labor laws (Steele, 2021).

Heather Brown has a plausible legal claim under the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) as her employer failed to provide adequate protection against COVID-19 in the workplace. Moreover, Heather was terminated in retaliation for reporting safety concerns or requesting accommodations due to COVID-19, invoking the protections of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). Capra Tec may face damages encompassing lost wages and legal fees (Steele, 2021).

Leah Parrish might have a valid claim under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) if she was denied leave or retaliated against for taking it. Additionally, she may have a viable claim if denied reasonable accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The risk to Capra Tec hinges on the potential damages awarded in a potential lawsuit, including lost wages, benefits, emotional distress, and possibly punitive damages (Smith, 2020).

Chris McCoy’s complaint may be justifiable under The Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA), which requires employers to ensure a secure and healthy working environment.. Chris McCoy’s assertion of an unsafe working environment may align with OSHA regulations. If established, Capra Tec could face financial consequences through penalties and citations from OSHA (Jennings & Perez, 2020). Get DB FPX8410 Assessment 2 Analyze a Set of Worker Complaints

John Kowalski holds a legitimate claim under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) as he was terminated or retaliated against for participating in protected concerted activities with his coworkers. Additionally, his denial of reasonable accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) bolsters his claim. The risk to Capra Tec depends on the potential damages awarded in a potential lawsuit, including lost income/wages, benefits, emotional distress and suffering, as well as potentially punitive damages (Jennings & Perez, 2020).

Thomas Edwards might possess a viable legal claim under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) if he was not adequately compensated for all hours worked or under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) if his termination was related to age discrimination. The viability of his claim relies on the specific details of his situation. If deemed valid, Capra Tec may be at risk of paying damages for lost income and wages along with legal fees, as evidenced by a case where a pharmaceutical company was fined $253 million for age discrimination (Andrias, 2019).

DB FPX8410 Assessment 2 Analyze a Set of Worker Complaints

Mona Sims may have a plausible claim under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) if she can substantiate that she faced discrimination due to her age. Additionally, if she was denied reasonable accommodations under the ADA, she might have a legitimate claim. The risk to Capra Tec hinges on potential damages awarded in a lawsuit, encompassing lost wages, benefits, emotional distress, and potentially punitive damages (PengJu & Hua, 2023).

John Braganza might have a valid claim under the NLRA if he was terminated or retaliated against for participating in protected concerted activities with his coworkers. Additionally, if he was denied reasonable accommodations under the ADA, he may possess a valid claim. The risk to Capra Tec is contingent on potential damages awarded in a lawsuit, which may include lost wages, benefits, emotional distress, along with potentially punitive damages (Jennings & Perez, 2020).

Geoffrey Jones may have a credible claim under the Civil Rights Act of 1991 if his termination was based on his race or under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) if it was age-related. Whether his case holds merit would depend on the specific circumstances, Like DB FPX8410 Assessment 2 Analyze a Set of Worker Complaints. If found valid, Capra Tec could face financial liabilities, including lost wages and associated legal expenses (PengJu & Hua, 2023).

Monica Fuentes is facing workplace bullying and harassment from a colleague, raising concerns for her safety and well-being. Her claim regarding workplace bullying and harassment is potentially valid under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and relevant state laws. The risk to Monica’s emotional and mental well-being is substantial, and if not addressed, it could lead to enduring psychological harm. Financial consequences may encompass medical expenses, lost wages due to absenteeism, and compensation for pain and suffering (Federal Trade Commission, 2023).

DB FPX8410 Assessment 2 Analyze a Set of Worker Complaints

Adam Humphrey, a Parts Runner who alleges age discrimination as a minor, may have a viable case depending on his ability to provide evidence of age-based discrimination, such as unfavorable treatment in comparison to younger employees, age-related comments, or unjust termination. The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) prevents bias against individuals aged 40 and above. The potential risk to Capra Tec is a lawsuit for age discrimination, potentially resulting in damages like back pay, front pay, compensatory damages, and punitive damages (PengJu & Hua, 2023).

Joanne Martin’s complaint may be valid under The Fair Labor Standards Act, which sets forth requirements regarding minimum wage, overtime pay, and recordkeeping. Joanne Martin’s allegation of inappropriate changes in her work schedule could potentially relate to violations of overtime pay requirements. If substantiated, Capra Tec may face financial liability in the form of unpaid wages. DB FPX8410 Assessment 2 Analyze a Set of Worker Complaints

Omari Masri’s complaint may hold merit under The Fair Labor Standards Act, which establishes criteria for minimum wage, overtime pay, and recordkeeping. Omari Masri’s assertion of not receiving wages might pertain to breaches of minimum wage requirements. Capra Tec could face financial repercussions through unpaid wages if this claim is validated (Mcintosh & Moss, 2020).

Conclusion

In DB FPX8410 Assessment 2 Analyze a Set of Worker Complaints Companies can enhance their employees’ working conditions by implementing and enforcing various rules and regulations. These regulations, such as Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) guidelines, and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards, are in place to promote fairness and equality in the workplace. By adhering to these laws and regulations, companies create an environment that values equal treatment and safety for all employees. Failure to comply with these regulations can expose a company to potential legal consequences.

References

Adel, R., & Alqatan, D. A. (2019, November 27). Gender employment discrimination: A comparison between the banking sectors of Kuwait and the United Kingdom. Social Science Research Network. 

Andrias, K. (2019). An American approach to social democracy: The forgotten promise of the Fair Labor Standards Act. The Yale Law Journal, 128(3), 616–709. 

Brue, K. (2021). Organizational change: Where have all the leaders gone when creating anti-harassment cultures? Administrative Issues Journal: Connecting Education, Practice, and Research, 11(1), 17–35. 

Carnevale, J. B., & Hatak, I. (2020). Employee adjustment and well-being in the era of COVID-19: Implications for human resource management. Journal of Business Research, 116(116), 183–187. NCBI.

Cox, T., & Lowrie, K. (2021). From the editors: Setting risk management priorities. Risk Analysis, 41(8), 1255–1256. https://doi.org/10.1111/risa.13811

Federal Trade Commission. (2023). Protections against discrimination and other prohibited practices. Federal Trade Commission. https://www.ftc.gov/policy-notices/no-fear-act/protections-against-discrimination

Ilyin, E. A., & Demidov, N. (2020). Employee abuse: Typical case studies. Юридическая наука и практика, 15(4), 29–34. https://doi.org/10.25205/2542-0410-2019-15-4-29-34

Jennings, W. G., & Perez, N. M. (2020). The immediate impact of COVID-19 on law enforcement in the United States. American Journal of Criminal Justice, 45

Levavi, D. (2019). Discrimination in the American workplace: Developing and maintaining a diverse healthcare labor force. SSRN Electronic Journal

Mcintosh, K., & Moss, E. (2020). Examining the Black-white wealth gap. https://memphis.uli.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/49/2020/07/Examining-the-Black-white-wealth-gap.pdf

Pascarella, G., Rossi, M., Montella, E., Capasso, A., De Feo, G., Botti, G., Nardone, A., Montuori, P., Triassi, M., D’Auria, S., & Morabito, A. (2021). Risk analysis in healthcare organizations: Methodological framework and critical variables. Risk Management and Healthcare Policy, Volume 14(14), 2897–2911. 

PengJu, Z., & Hua, Z. (2023). A study on employment discrimination for older people – The construction and improvement of China’s “Anti-employment discrimination law.” Korean Citation Index, 71, 393–434. 

Rudakov, V. N., & Prakhov, I. A. (2020). Gender differences in pay among university faculty in Russia. Higher Education Quarterly, 75(2), 278–301. 

Steele, D. (2021). Preserving pandemic protections. SSRN Electronic Journal, 42

Sun, W., Dedahanov, A. T., Fayzullaev, A. K. ugli, & Abdurazzakov, O. S. (2022). Abusive supervision and employee voice: The roles of positive reappraisal and employee cynicism. Frontiers in Psychology, 13

Wang, X., Jacob, W. J., Blakesley, C. C., Xiong, W., Ye, H., Xu, S., & Lu, F. (2020). Optimal professional development ICT training initiatives at flagship universities. Education and Information Technologies, 25(5), 4397–4416.