NURS FPX 1150 Assessment 4 Living History

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NURS FPX 1150 Assessment 4 Living History

Living History

NURS FPX 1150 Assessment 4 Living History

In the 18th and 19th centuries, women were held to slave-like demands rather than the duties of brides and life partners (Borodenko, 2020). They owe it to their spouses to do their allotted jobs. The work of these women is already strenuous due to the many duties they bear. The existing condition of women compelled them to take action, and the women’s suffrage movement was established. They remain prepared to confront their problems and claim their rights equally. They confront significant difficulties in attaining their most basic rights, such as the right to an education and a job, as well as the right to legal recognition and the custody of their children. Due to their exposure to these adversities, they stand out in the battle for women’s suffrage. The United States saw economic and political growth as a consequence of a long and grueling struggle for women’s suffrage. It is impossible to overestimate the importance of these events. They traveled to America in 1840 to initiate a discussion about women’s rights. Mott and Cady, an increasing number of diligent and concerned women, are joining their party to ensure the state’s ability to provide women with equal rights (Gaffarova, 2021). Each of them feels strongly enough about the issue of human slavery to attend conferences devoted to combating it.

Description of Historical Movement

In the 18th century, both ancient Greece and Republican Rome advocated for the exclusion of women from the franchise (Komar, 2021). This did not change the reality that women in the United Kingdom and Europe lacked even the most basic rights in 1832. I saw directly how difficult it was for women to obtain their legal rights in the eighteenth century. On the other hand, British and American women who dwell in these nations refuse to give up the fight for equal rights. According to a well-known fact, countries other than the United Kingdom and the United States play a key role in promoting and enabling the granting of women’s rights (Meili, 2018). Around the turn of the twentieth century, New Zealand, Australia, Finland, and the United States granted women the right to vote in national elections. 

NURS FPX 1150 Assessment 4 Living History

Since World War I, mainly in Europe, there has been an increase in the number of legislations regulating women’s voting rights (Jing, 2019). It is crucial to remember that women enjoy equal voting rights and opportunities in 28 nations. This must be monitored closely. They have the same rights and benefits as men, including voting in national elections. This group includes, among others, the United States, Canada, Germany, Austria, Poland, Hong Kong, the United Kingdom, Burma, Ecuador, South Africa, Brazil, Uruguay, Thailand, Turkey, Cuba, and the Philippines (Madden, 2022). It is encouraging to note that every country enables women to vote in elections at all levels, from local to provincial to national. I feel that this is a critical step toward equal voting rights for women.

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Historical Movement and Personal Impacts

Women from all over the globe, including France, Italy, Romania, Yugoslavia, and China, are now free to negotiate for their rights, giving the women’s suffrage movement a renewed feeling of impetus after World War II. In India, women were given their rights in 1949, while in Pakistan, they were granted their rights in 1956 (Gupta, 2021). The right to vote has been extended to more than one hundred nations, where citizens may exercise it at various levels of governance. The Swiss federal government allows female citizens to vote in national elections. Many Americans feel that women should have the right to vote and an equal political voice. Nonetheless, women in countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom exert tremendous influence in the drive to implement their rights on every level (Gupta, 2021).

Slaver Great Depression

By 1848, New York City will host the first convention on women’s rights (Oliveira, 2019). It is time to pick up the pace and become more active during social gatherings. Local newspaper advertisements for the conference were made available to the general audience. The agenda for the conference declares that men and women have the same legal rights. In addition, women are permitted to engage professionally in all areas of life, including business, commerce, and trade (Oliveira, 2019). The conference’s purpose is to guarantee the safety and security of all women, regardless of socioeconomic standing. No of their position in society, men and women should have equal access to land.

Potential Impact on Future

Regarding women’s rights, the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution grants women the authority to stand independently against various political forces throughout American history (Romeo, 2019). The number of highly qualified voters increases the total number of individuals entitled to vote. Voting rights for women are intended to expand both the history of women’s rights and the potential of women. The extension of women’s rights in society’s political and economic sectors is its central concern. The ballot movement’s aims are more likely to make it simpler for women to get fair and equal treatment in politics (Romeo, 2019). 

NURS FPX 1150 Assessment 4 Living History

Plans to increase women’s rights often encourage them to claim their full citizenship rights. The campaign for women’s suffrage is striving to implement a strategy to develop worldwide female solidarity (Belliard, 2020). It is still in operation to safeguard the global survival of political liberty. This struggle was an essential step forward for women’s rights throughout the globe. In most states, it guarantees women the right to vote at all government levels, regardless of gender. This has a good effect on the lives of women. Voting is crucial to achieving gender equality in our society and the workplace.

References

Belliard, C. M. (2020). An echo in France of the British women’s suffrage campaign. Women’s History Review, 1–9. https://doi.org/10.1080/09612025.2020.1745415 

Borodenko, O. (2020). Blood-spiritual relationship as a marriage permitting requirement for ukrainian brides of the second half of the 18th – the first half of the 19th centuries. Zaporizhzhia Historical Review, 3(55), 9–15. https://doi.org/10.26661/zhv-2020-3-55-01 

Gaffarova, S. N. (2021). Features of Uzbekistan’s experience in ensuring equal rights of women and men. The American Journal of Political Science Law and Criminology, 03(04), 46–54. https://doi.org/10.37547/tajpslc/volume03issue04-08 

Gupta, M. (2021). Women rights as human rights: Comparative study of India and Pakistan. International Journal of Political Science and Governance, 3(2), 76–81. https://doi.org/10.33545/26646021.2021.v3.i2b.111 

Jing, C. (2019). Freedom from fear: has it faded since the udhr? on the approaches of europe and china. Cross-Cultural Human Rights Review, 1(1-3), 130. https://doi.org/10.52854/cchrr.32 

NURS FPX 1150 Assessment 4 Living History

Komar, P. (2021). Wine taboo regarding women in archaic rome, origins of italian viticulture, and the taste of ancient wines. Greece and Rome, 68(2), 239–254. https://doi.org/10.1017/s001738352100005x 

Madden, M. (2022). Judging readability: a study of opinions written by apex court judges from australia, canada, south africa, the united kingdom, and the united states. SSRN Electronic Journal. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4160956 

Meili, S. (2018). Do human rights treaties matter?: judicial responses to the detention of asylum seekers in the united states and the united kingdom. SSRN Electronic Journal. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3126302 

Oliveira, G. (2019). Undocumented Mexican immigrant women’s direct sales work in New York City. Women’s Studies International Forum, 75, 102238. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wsif.2019.102238 Romeo, E. (2019). An almost inconceivable foe: anglo-american women and violence against colonial authority in seventeenth-century new england. Journal of Women’s History, 31(2), 80–100. https://doi.org/10.1353/jowh.2019.0015