POLI 330 Week 6 Assignment Part I How the Courts Address or Respect Our Rights as Citizens

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A. Case Summary

In 1967, the Loving v. Virginia case resulted in a significant shift in the acceptance of interracial marriage. This landmark case involved Richard Loving, a white man, and Mildred Jeter, an African American woman, who traveled to Washington D.C. to marry. However, upon returning to their home state of Virginia, they were arrested for violating the state’s law prohibiting interracial marriage. The case was unprecedented at the time, as the United States Supreme Court had never before addressed such a matter.

B. Case Outline

  1. Title: Loving v. Virginia, 388 U.S. 1 (1967)
  2. Facts of the Case
  3. Virginia had laws prohibiting marriage between African Americans and whites.
  4. Richard Loving, a white man, and Mildred Jeter, an African American woman, got married in Washington D.C. to avoid Virginia’s anti-miscegenation law.

POLI 330 Week 6 Assignment Part I How the Courts Address or Respect Our Rights as Citizens

III. History of the Case

  1. In July 1958, the Lovings were arrested for violating Virginia’s ban on interracial marriage.
  2. The Lovings pleaded guilty in Virginia’s state court to violating section 20-58 of Virginia’s state code.
  3. The Lovings were sentenced to one year in jail.
  4. Legal Questions
  5. The U.S. Supreme Court had to decide if the laws banning interracial marriage were discriminatory.
  6. The court had to examine whether the Equal Protection Clause was applicable.
  7. The court had to decide whether to reverse the Lovings’ convictions or not.
  8. Decision or Holdings
  9. The court ruled in favor of the defendant.
  10. The Lovings challenged Virginia’s verdict on their case.
  11. Every state court in Virginia had either denied their case or convicted them.
  12. Verdict and Opinion (Judgment)
  13. Justice Stewart wrote in his concurring opinion that it was unconstitutional for state law to depend on a person’s race.
  14. Nine justices decided in favor of the defendant, and none decided against.
  15. The final judgment was that Virginia’s laws prohibiting interracial marriage were unconstitutional.

POLI 330 Week 6 Assignment Part I How the Courts Address or Respect Our Rights as Citizens

C. Conclusion

The ruling in Loving v. Virginia had a significant impact as it invalidated the ban on interracial marriage in Virginia, allowing the Lovings to stay married. This decision also paved the way for 15 other states to strike down similar laws against interracial marriage, ultimately changing how these marriages were viewed. The case is considered a landmark decision in civil rights history and has helped to advance the cause of equality and justice in America.

References:

Duignan, B. (2020). Loving v. Virginia | Summary, Date, Ruling, Facts, & Significance.

Encyclopedia Britannica.

https://www.britannica.com/event/Loving-v-Virginia

Greenberg, E. S., & Page, B. I. (2018). The Struggle for Democracy, 2018 Elections and

Updates Edition (12th Edition). Pearson Education (US).

https://ambassadored.vitalsource.com/books/9780135246849

Justia Law. (2020). Loving v. Virginia, 388 U.S. 1 (1967).

https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/388/1/